Analyzing the Travesty of Election Day 2012


Along with many in the Republican Party and the conservative movement, I was profoundly shocked at the loss Mitt Romney suffered at the hands of Barack Obama, a weak president with a pathetic record.  But perhaps I shouldn’t have been surprised since we had a weak and pathetic candidate ourselves, but I held out hope that things were swinging in our direction.  It was not to be.

The question on the minds of many, including the GOP, is how this happened.  Was it because of shifting demographics?  That fact certainly played a role.  With millions of Hispanics pouring into the country for decades, once reliable red states are now reliably blue, as that group voted 71 percent for Obama.

Was it because the conservative white base is shrinking, or that conservative white voters did not turn out?  Both are true.  Romney gained three million fewer votes than did John McCain in 2008, and McCain was no conservative favorite. Continue reading

Why do Americans have to learn the hard way?


It seems we never learn. Every now and then, the American people hand some poor soul, undeserving in many cases, the national levers of power.  And in each and every instance, it has cost us dearly.  There are several historical periods of note.

John Adams, himself a political giant, was imminently qualified for the presidency, at least on paper.  But he had the most unenviable of tasks, perhaps in all of American history.  He had to follow George Washington as president.  And he did a lousy job.

Rather than reverse course from what Washington and Alexander Hamilton had begun, Adams built on it, continuing an oppressive system of taxation and top-down management of the nation’s affairs.  A people who had just fought a war of independence over taxation now saw the imposition of an even more draconian system, one that included direct federal taxes on everything from whiskey and tobacco to land and homes. Continue reading

Campaigning for the Presidency


In the good ole days of the republic, during the 19th century, it was a cardinal principle of American politics that the man did not seek the office; instead, the office sought the man.  This was especially true in presidential elections when candidates never took to the stump, especially if one held an office and was seeking a second term.  That’s not to say that they were not involved, just not openly and actively involved.

Today it seems we have come full circle.  Rather than concentrate on his work as president, like say, attending all of his intelligence briefings so he can know what’s going on in hotspots like Libya, President Obama has spent the better part of this year doing nothing but campaigning. Continue reading

The Truth About Wealth Re-Distribution


A recurring theme throughout this campaign season has been the distribution of the nation’s wealth, stirred by President Obama and the Occupy movement.  A new phrase has entered the American political lexicon:  the 99 percent versus 1 percent.

Mitt Romney stirred up the political waters recently with remarks about wealth distribution and government dependency.

“There are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what,” he told supporters at a private fundraiser.  “All right, there are 47% who are with him, who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you-name-it.  [They believe] that’s an entitlement.  And the government should give it to them.  And they will vote for this president no matter what.”

Though what he spoke was truth, the Mainstream Media went wild.  At the same time, a 1998 tape was released of then-state senator Obama speaking in favor of re-distributing wealth.  Yet the media just yawned. Continue reading

Assessing the Romney-Ryan Ticket


Thomas R. Marshall, Vice President for Woodrow Wilson, once told a story indicative of his job’s anonymity.  “There once were two brothers.  One ran away to sea, the other was elected vice president.  Neither one of them was heard of again.”

Today, however, the office is much more prestigious and powerful, causing many politicians to seek it, rather than run from it, even though it can still wreck a career.  Just ask Dan Quayle.

Over the weekend, Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney declared his choice for a vice presidential running mate, Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan.  The pick was bold and seems to have excited conservatives and Tea Partiers, who thus far have been lukewarm toward the top of the ticket.  Since the announcement, massive crowds have gathered at Romney-Ryan rallies, some of the largest yet seen this season. Continue reading