The Real Legacy of Gettysburg


This week marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, fought on July 1-3, 1863 in a small Pennsylvania town.  Celebrations began on Sunday and are scheduled to last all week.  Articles and commentary from across the political spectrum will flood the Internet and the airways in praise of those who fell on that hallowed ground in defense of liberty.

Yet the praise will be directed at Union forces.  But what about the 28,000 Southern soldiers who died for what they believed in?  Did they risk less?  Were their ideals any less glorious than those above the Mason Dixon line?

We have come to expect as much from leftwing Northern “scholars,” as well as Southern scalawags.  But, painfully, those who call themselves conservatives will take the Union side in the conflict as well. Continue reading

The United States of Authoritarianism


“Our progress in degeneracy appears to me to be pretty rapid,” Abraham Lincoln said in 1855.  “As a nation, we began by declaring that ‘all men are created equal.’  We now practically read it ‘all men are created equal, except negroes.’  Soon it will read ‘all men are created equal, except negroes, and foreigners, and Catholics.’  When it comes to this I should prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty – to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure, and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.”

Though I am no fan of Lincoln, who was nothing short of a despot himself, I do believe his quote is as applicable today as it ever was.  Do we not have a “base alloy of hypocrisy” in regards to our land of liberty?  We seem to want to uphold our ideals, praise our Founders, and celebrate the 4th of July with picnics and parades.  But in this day and age do we really believe it?

If we do, why then do we allow our federal government to run roughshod over the Constitution and the ideals enshrined in the Declaration of Independence?  Why did we just re-elect a man president who clearly does not hold any of these values? Continue reading