Thad Cochran’s False Leadership


Webster’s dictionary defines leadership this way:  “The power or ability to lead other people.”  A business dictionary defines it as “establishing a clear vision, sharing that vision with others so that they will follow willingly, providing the information, knowledge and methods to realize that vision.”  Can we honestly say this describes Thad Cochran’s time in Washington over the last four decades?  Many conservatives think not. Continue reading

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Chris McDaniel: Mr. Fiscal Conservative


With the US Senate race in full swing throughout the state of Mississippi, new charges have emerged from supporters of Thad Cochran in a pathetic and desperate attempt to paint Chris McDaniel as an untrustworthy politician in regards to his fiscal record as a member of the state senate and to attack his “misguided criticism of Cochran’s service to Mississippi,” in the recent words of Mr. Brian Perry in the Leader Call. Mr. Geoff Pender of the Clarion Ledger has also made similar arguments to attempt to discredit Senator McDaniel’s record of fiscal conservatism.

To begin with, Mr. Perry and Mr. Pender engaged in a classic political trick:  cherry-picking votes. They took one vote Senator McDaniel made in 2009 in favor of an $282 million omnibus spending bill to make their case that he is not as fiscally conservative as he claims and that he is, in essence, no different than his opponent, Thad Cochran.  Their inference is that Senator McDaniel is a fiscal hypocrite willing to support pork and wasteful spending when it suits him, while attacking Cochran for doing likewise.  Yet it is nothing more than political blather suited for the ash heap. Continue reading

Ranking President Kennedy


Was JFK a great President?  As the nation marked the 50th anniversary of Jack Kennedy’s tragic assassination, new polling shows that many Americans consider him to be among our very best, ranking higher than any President in the last half century according to the latest Gallup survey.  Two years ago, he rated fourth all time, ahead of such Presidents as Washington and Jefferson.  But is this accurate?

As a historian, it makes little sense to rank a President who served just over one thousand days in office, rather than a full term or even two.  It’s very difficult to judge his more limited accomplishments and what effect they had on the nation and even the world. Continue reading

Thad Cochran’s Flaws Not Just Fiscal


In a recent post I exposed Thad’s Cochran’s horrific fiscal record, a legacy of taxing and spending worthy of any good liberal, but sadly that’s not the only flaw he possesses.  His career does not reflect true conservative principles in the areas of national defense, the culture wars, active government, and the environment.

It simply cannot be said that Thad Cochran is supportive of all efforts to maintain a strong national defense and protect our borders.  In 1982 he voted for amnesty for illegals, and in 2005 against a small increase in funds for tighter border security.  Senator Cochran voted to cut $80 million from the Titan missile program in 1982 and voted against increases in the MX missile system and the new Midgetman missiles that President Reagan wanted as part of his defense buildup. Continue reading

Exposing Thad Cochran’s Real Fiscal Record


No sooner had Senator Chris McDaniel launched his campaign for the United States Senate, a race pitting him against a six-term incumbent, when the defenders of the status quo came to the aging incumbent Thad Cochran’s defense.  One fearless Cochran guardian, Brian Perry from Madison County, recently wrote in the Laurel Leader Call that without the elder Senator’s presence in Washington there would be Mississippi “counties without hospitals or roads to get to where the hospitals are not.”  Without the tireless work of Senator Cochran, says Perry, we would have closed military bases, fewer police, and smaller universities.  Perry’s inference is clear: if we vote for change and a true conservative in Chris McDaniel, we won’t have any roads, public buildings, police officers, military bases, or schools to attend.  We will immediately revert to the 18th century I suppose. Continue reading

The Constitution and the Income Tax


Americans love anniversaries and this year marks some pretty remarkable ones, most notably the sesquicentennial of the battle of Gettysburg and the fall of Vicksburg, two events that dealt a crippling blow to the Confederacy in the summer of 1863, and the 50th anniversary of the JFK assassination.  But 2013 also marks the centennial of another crucial event, the enactment of the infamous income tax.

Pushed by Liberals for decades in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the income tax was supposed to be the “great leveling,” a policy that would correct the long-festering problem of wealth inequality.  However, there was one problem – the Constitution specifically prohibited the government from taxing the American people directly. Continue reading

Illuminating Our Presidential Nominees


Obamacare just keeps getting better and better. Not only will government bureaucrats have access to your medical records, but now we find out that the law will require all doctors to probe each patient’s sex life, with very intrusive questioning, regardless if a particular medical specialist needs the information or not.  So, if you visit your cardiologist or gastroenterologist in the not-to-distant future, get ready for a sex questionnaire.  And all this, mind you, from a President who has chosen to keep most of his life away from the eyes of the public.

As you recall, there was great controversy over Obama’s birth certificate, which hasn’t really been solved, but that’s another story.  He has failed to release: school records, including transcripts and admission records; passport records, to see where and how he traveled overseas; medical records, even though he wants to government to see ours; or his records from his stint as an Illinois state senator. Continue reading